Endometrial Biopsy

This biopsy is done in the doctor’s office, where the lining of the uterus is sampled via removing a portion of the endometrium and checked to see its receptivity to an embryo and how it correlates with the woman’s blood hormone tests. Done several days before menstruation, it can show the endometrial response to the hormones estrogen and progesterone and can determine if ovulation has occurred.

The procedure The test is performed either in the doctor’s office or in a local hospital. The patient may be asked to take pain medication (like Motrin or Aleve) an hour or so before the procedure. A local anesthetic may be injected into the cervix in order to decrease pain and discomfort during the procedure.

The woman will be asked to lie on her back with knees apart and feet in stirrups. The doctor will first conduct a thorough exam of the pelvic region, including the vulva (the external genitals), vagina, and uterus. A speculum (an instrument that is used to hold the walls of the vagina open) will be inserted into the vagina. A small, hollow plastic tube is then passed into the uterine cavity. A small piece of the uterine lining is sucked out with a plunger that is attached to the tube. Once the sample is obtained, the instruments are removed and the sample is sent to the lab. The patient may experience some pain when the cervix is grasped. The patient may also feel some cramping, pressure, and discomfort when the instruments are inserted into the uterus and the tissue sample is collected

After the procedure If you received any type of sedative, you will need someone to drive you home. You may want to wear a sanitary pad for bleeding. It is normal to have some mild cramping and spotting or vaginal bleeding for a few days after the procedure. Take a pain reliever for soreness as recommended by your physician. Aspirin or certain other pain medications may increase the chance of bleeding.

Follow us

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*